15 most beautiful temples of the Old world

1. St. Basil’s Cathedral
Orthodox
Moscow, Russia
Its construction began in the XVI century
Pokrovsky Cathedral, also known as the temple, many believe the symbol of Moscow and whole Russia. Nobody is not set to the name of the master who built it. According to the legend, on the orders of Tsar Ivan the terrible blinded the Creator to nowhere and he never reproduced the unique architecture of the Cathedral. In Stalin’s time, the temple, its bright “candy” style sharply contrasted with the strict walls of the Kremlin and discontinously with demonstrations on red square, it was decided to demolish. From destruction saved him brave protest scholar-restorer, which cost the last several years of camps.
2. The Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore
Catholic
Florence, Italy
The construction started in the XIII century

The construction of this Cathedral, the main attractions of Florence, lasted for six centuries: the first stone in the Foundation of the temple was laid in 1296, and the façade in its present form only appeared in 1887. Until recently, Santa Maria del Fiore was the largest Cathedral in Europe, because was initially conceived as a facility that can accommodate the entire population of the city. The world fame of the temple brought us a giant red dome, uniquely made of brick without the use of supporting scaffolding.
3. Seville Cathedral
Catholic
Seville, Spain
Its construction began in the XV century

The largest Gothic Cathedral and third largest Church in the world. It was laid as a symbol of the prosperity of the city, then became a European trading center. According to local tradition, the decision to build was taken with the words: “let’s build a Church so beautiful and majestic to everyone who sees it, thought we were mad”. There is a theory that the cross of the Cathedral was made from gold brought from America by Columbus, and in the Church are buried the remains of the famous sailor. Although the assumption historians doubt.
4. Milan Cathedral
Catholic
Milan, Italy
Its construction began in the XV century

The Duomo, as it is called the Cathedral of Milan, is the fourth largest Church in Europe. Its construction lasted 600 years and was completed thanks to Emperor Napoleon, who ordered to finish the construction of the façade of the Cathedral and has approved its appearance. In the XVIII century over the white marble Gothic Cathedral erected 106-meter spire with a four-meter gold-plated statue of the Madonna. He was then issued a decree that no building in Milan should not obscure it. To violate this rule Milan skyscrapers established a small copy of the Madonna of the Duomo Cathedral.
5. Cologne Cathedral
Catholic
Cologne, Germany
The construction started in the XIII century

Two spires of Cologne Cathedral – the first thing that appears in front of the entrance to the Cologne. This is the largest temple in Europe third in the world in height, and in addition, it boasts the world’s largest facade. The builders of this great building were set two tasks. Cologne in those days was considered one of the richest and most powerful cities of the German Empire, and its Cathedral was its scale to overshadow the other churches. The temple was the resting place of the sacred remains of the Magi, or Three kings, are in a Golden sarcophagus inlaid with precious stones, were transferred to Cologne from Milan in one of the monasteries. The enormity of the structure was to emphasize the higher status that had the Cologne in the Christian world with their appearance.
6. The St. Vitus Cathedral
Catholic
Prague, Czech Republic
Its construction began in the XIV century

On the territory of national historical shrines of Czech Republic, St. Vitus Cathedral at Prague castle, buried Czech kings and archbishops of Prague. In the same Cathedral, which was built more than 600 years, the crown crown jewels of the Czech Republic.
In modern times the Cathedral was the object of a protracted strife between the secular and Catholic Czech society. After the Second world war the Communist regime confiscated it in favor of the state, and the last 20 years the Church has made his return to the fold. Authorities, including President Vaclav Klaus, for many years opposed it. In 2009 the Czech Supreme court put the point in dispute is not in favor of the Catholic community.
7. The Sagrada Familia
Catholic
Barcelona, Spain
Start of construction – XIX century

The construction of the temple designed by the great architect Antoni gaudí, lasted more than 100 years, because from the very beginning on the idea of the initiators of the building he was supposed to be built solely on the donations of parishioners. The temple was laid in 1882, and only in 2010 it was consecrated by Pope Benedict XVI and was officially declared ready for worship. Gaudí himself worked on the construction of this building for 40 years, 15 of which were engaged in them exceptional, until he died in 1929. During the life of the architect of delay, prevent the completion of construction, caused his contemporaries many questions. For them, the architect invariably replied: “My client is in a hurry”.
8. The Hunchback Of Notre Dame
Catholic
Paris, France
The construction started in the XII century

The Cathedral of Notre Dame became one of the most famous Gothic churches in the world largely due to the popular novel of Victor Hugo. For nearly 200 years of construction it was the work of many architects, so the tower and the Western part of the temple differ in style and even size. For many centuries the Cathedral was the venue of Royal weddings and coronations Imperial and 1302-m it came the first French Parliament.
9. Chartres Cathedral
Catholic
Chartres, France
The construction started in the XII century

This Cathedral is 90 km from Paris – one of the few European cult temples that escaped the destruction, plundering and restorations. The temple is famous for its unique collection of medieval coloured stained-glass Windows, total area of 2 thousand sq. m. In the Cathedral over 150 of them, the oldest was made nine centuries ago. While bright colors are stained glass Windows of Chartres, to this day has not faded. However the secret of their composition of glass lost.
10. St. Paul’s Cathedral
Anglican
London, UK
Its construction began in the XVII century

On the site of the present residence of the Bishop of London, built by architect Christopher Wren in the late seventeenth century, once stood four different St. Paul’s Cathedral. And the first of them was built in the year 604. All of them were destroyed during the fires and raids of the Vikings. St. Paul’s Cathedral is the burial place of the 200 most prominent citizens of the UK, including Admiral Horatio Nelson and former Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Here in April of this year there has passed ceremony of farewell to the Iron lady – Margaret Thatcher.
11. The Sacré-Coeur Basilica
Catholic
Paris, France
Start of construction – XIX century

Sacred Heart Basilica stands at the highest point of Paris on top of Montmartre hill. This is the second most visited after the Notre-Dame de Paris is a monument of France. It is built on the money of the French Catholics in memory of the victims of the Franco-Prussian war, and “to atone for the sins” of the Paris commune in 1871, after the Franco-Prussian war Montmartre was the starting point of the uprising of the Communards, and after the massacre with them, the National Assembly decided to build a Church. In sacré-Coeur is the largest bell of the French capital – cast in 1891 Savoyard weight 19 tons
12. Westminster Abbey
Anglican
London, UK
Start of construction – X century

The current collegiate Church of St. Peter in Westminster for residents of Albion, a milestone place. Traditionally, Westminster Abbey is the place of coronation and burial of British monarchs for a thousand years, its walls have held 16 Royal weddings. Up to 1365 in the dungeons of Westminster Abbey were kept the English crown jewels, the Treasury and crown jewels. Individual attraction of the Abbey is poet’s corner, where the ashes of famous writers, including Charles Dickens.
13. St. Mark’s Cathedral
Catholic
Venice, Italy
Start of construction – XI century

In St. Mark’s Cathedral, considered one of the world’s finest examples of Byzantine architecture, the relics of the patron Saint of Venice, St. Mark, and his mark, the lion, became the symbol of this city. For the resting place of the relics of the Apostle, carried to Venice in 829 from Alexandria, was built the first Basilica. After the old Church burned down, in the eleventh century was founded the one that survived until today. The Cathedral houses many valuable works of art taken from the plundered Constantinople during the Crusades, including the famous Quadriga that once adorned Constantinople’s Hippodrome, and the Golden altar.
14. Saint Sophia Cathedral
A former Orthodox Cathedral, then a mosque, today a Museum
Istanbul, Turkey
Start of construction – VI century

Hagia Sophia – the Wisdom of God, or as it officially name today, the Hagia Sophia, is one of the most famous churches in the world: 1.500 years of history he had even visited the Orthodox Cathedral and Muslim mosque. During the Byzantine Empire, the Cathedral stood in the centre of Constantinople, near the Emperor’s Palace. For over 1,000 years was the largest Church of Christendom and was so luxurious that legends were told about the participation in the construction of the heavenly powers. In a Muslim mosque, an Orthodox Church was converted after the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottoman Empire in 1453: the Church built a four minarets, and renamed Agia Sophia. And in 1935, the mosque became a Museum.
15. Mosteiro DOS Jeronimos
Catholic
Lisbon, Portugal
Its construction began in the XV century

The convent of Jeronimos in Lisbon, more commonly called Geronimus, – a Grand monument of the Portuguese architecture and the most impressive symbol of the power and wealth of the Portuguese age of discovery. It is inextricably linked with the history of the monastery.